Covered Bridges of Windsor County

"NEW TAFTSVILLE BRIDGE"

“NEW TAFTSVILLE BRIDGE”

Cornish Windsor Bridge

Cornish Windsor Bridge

Willard Bridge

Willard Bridge

Martins Mill Bridge

Martins Mill Bridge

Bowers Bridge

Bowers Bridge

Bests Bridge

Bests Bridge

Salmond Bridge

Salmond Bridge

Downers Bridge

Downers Bridge

I thought in honor of the upcoming grand re-opening of the Taftsville Covered Bridge,  September 7th, 2013, I would give you a little tour and history of the covered bridges in Windsor County, Vermont.  All of these bridges are less than an hours drive from the Canterbury House.  In fact, Bob and I decided last Sunday, to do our own little tour of these amazing structures.  The entire tour took us a few hours, and it was quite fun.  We visited 8 bridges in all, out of a total of 11.  The three we did NOT visit, were bridges that are right here in Woodstock and Quechee.  Since we see these bridges on a daily basis, no new tour of them was needed.

Okay, on to the tour….I tried to make our trip as linear and efficient as possible, so in order, here is the list:

1.  Downers Bridge- Weathersfield. Built in 1840. Span 120′  Structure type: Town Lattice.

2.  Salmond Bridge- Weathersfield.  Built 1880. Span 54′/ Structure type:  kingpost truss.  Previously located in 2      different locations, it was first moved in 1959 to take it out of a flood control area.  It was moved to Amsden, VT were it was used as a town  storage shed.  It was moved to its present location in 1986.

3.  Bests Bridge-West Windsor. Built 1890. Span 37′.  Structure: Tied Arch.  One of the shortest covered bridges in Vermont. 

4.  Bowers Bridge-West Windsor.  Built 1909. Span 48′.  Structure Tied Arch. Rebuilt 2012.  Tropical storm Irene  destroyed it, 2011.

5. Cornish-Windsor Bridge- Windsor.  Built 1866. Span: Two spans totaling 460 feet, over the Connecticut River. Structure: Town Lattice.  This is the longest two-span covered bridge in the world and the longest covered bridge in the US.

6. Martins Mill Bridge-Hartland.  Built 1881.  Span 135′.  Structure Town      Lattice.

7. Willard Bridge- Hartland.  Built 1870. Span 125′. Structure: Town Lattice.  A few hundred feet down Mill Street is the bridge’s “twin”…..a newer covered bridge authentically built in 2001.  We did not see its’ twin.

8. Taftsville Bridge-Taftsville.  Built 1836. Span: Two spans totaling 190′.           Structure: Multiple kingpost truss and arches. Third oldest covered bridge  in Vermont.  The foundation of the bridge sustained substantial damage, from Tropical Storm Irene in 2011.  Has been reconstructed (using original boards and trusses).  Reopening September 2013.

You will notice that in my brief descriptions of these bridges I have indicated what type of structure they each were……..Town Lattice, Tied Arch or Timbered Trusses.  In order to not have you reading this blog for the next 10 years…..You can check out our website and see the page that Bob has put out, explaining all of this.  He also answers the question “Why are bridges covered?”  Check out the page on the website www.thecanterburyhouse.com.  If you go to the front page and click on the picture of the covered bridge…..for a wealth of information on covered bridges.

So, here is ONE MORE GREAT REASON TO COME TO WOODSTOCK. You won’t have to leave the county to see an abundance of covered bridges!!  If you stay at the Canterbury House we can get you started in the right direction of Covered Bridges overload!!!   Call us to reserve your room.

PS.  When you are visiting these bridges, we will certainly make sure you see Woodstock’s Middle Bridge and the Lincoln Covered Bridge.  They can easily be included in your Covered Bridges Tour.

 

 

 

 

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One Response to Covered Bridges of Windsor County

  1. Vita and Dan Lovett says:

    We really enjoyed not only seeing the great photographs but truly enjoyed the bridge fun facts! Next going to your website to read more.

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